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White Light
vs. Blue Light

BLC™ with Cysview®

White Light
vs. Blue Light

One Procedure. Two Settings. Unequaled Results.

A cystoscopy is a test that allows physicians to look directly inside the bladder. This test allows physicians to visually inspect the bladder lining for any abnormal growths or suspicious areas that may be causing your symptoms. Because of this, cystoscopy is an essential component of both the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer. The standard procedure is performed utilizing white light, and its success is entirely dependent on the ability to see tumors. 

Unfortunately, some tumors are difficult to see with white light. This is why white light alone may not be enough to detect all tumors. It is estimated that many bladder cancer tumors are missed using traditional white light cystoscopy, and a large percentage of patients have evidence of tumors on repeat transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) at two to six weeks.19-21

Blue Light Cystoscopy (BLC™) with Cysview®, in conjunction with white light cystoscopy, significantly improves the detection of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, compared to white light cystoscopy alone.4 This improved detection is the result of the imaging agent Cysview being absorbed by cancer cells and causing them to glow bright pink under blue light, highlighting any tumors that may have not been seen using white light alone.

Case 1

Case 2

Case 1: Example of White Light
WHITE LIGHT
VS
Case 1: Example of superior blue light
BLUE LIGHT
Case 2: Example of White Light
WHITE LIGHT
VS
Case 2: Example of superior blue light
BLUE LIGHT

The more clearly bladder cancer lesions can be seen, the more thoroughly they can be removed by TURBT. A more complete TURBT can result in better disease management decisions.

Read the frequently asked questions below and contact your doctor to discuss if BLC with Cysview is right for you.

BLC with Cysview
Frequently Asked Questions

Is BLC with Cysview right for me?

Blue Light Cystoscopy with Cysview® is recommended for anyone suspected or known to have lesion(s) based on a prior cystoscopy. You and your doctor can decide if this procedure is right for you. With over 100 centers, and counting, adopting BLC with Cysview, the technology should be accessible to you! Locate a center near you.

Is BLC with Cysview safe?

BLC with Cysview is safe and well-tolerated;13 however, no surgical procedure is free of any risk, and you should consult your doctor regarding the risks and benefits of this procedure. The most common patient complaints include such problems as bladder spasm and bladder pain, discomfort when urinating, and frequent urination. On rare occasions, patients have experienced increased heart rate, chest pain and fever. Although rare, hypersensitivity reactions may occur in some patients. 

What happens during BLC with Cysview?

About 2 ounces of Cysview solution is delivered (by medical staff) into the bladder at least one hour before your doctor examines the inside of the bladder with a procedure called cystoscopy. During the procedure, the doctor inserts a long, thin tube into the bladder. This tube, known as a cystoscope, allows your doctor to visually examine the inside of your bladder, first with white light, and then blue light. When the blue light mode is active, other tumors may become more visible, which gives your doctor the ability to better evaluate, identify and remove hard-to-see tumors more accurately. Learn more.

What should I expect after BLC with Cysview?

Most people are ready to go home shortly after a routine BLC with Cysview procedure; however, this is highly dependent on both the extent of your disease and the amount of tissue that may have been removed from your bladder. Once home, you should plan to rest to assist your body's recovery from the procedure and/or surgery. Consult your doctor on the length of rest he or she recommends. Common side effects include bladder spasms, painful urination and blood in your urine. If you experience bladder spasms, they may lead you to feeling like you need to urinate more often than you are normally used to. For a number of days after the procedure, you may feel some stinging during urination, and/or you may notice some blood in your urine.

In rare cases, patients may have increasing difficulty passing urine after their cystoscopy; should that happen, contact your physician. He or she may decide a catheter be left in the bladder to drain excess fluid until swelling goes down. Some patients may develop a mild infection after cystoscopy; this is usually treated with a standard course of antibiotics. Consult your physician if you are concerned about any effects you experience after the procedure.

Prescribing Information

Cysview is an optical imaging agent indicated for use in the cystoscopic detection of carcinoma of the bladder, including carcinoma in situ (CIS), among patients suspected or known to have lesion(s) on the basis of a prior cystoscopy, or in patients undergoing surveillance cystoscopy for carcinoma of the bladder. Cysview is used with the KARL STORZ D-Light C Photodynamic Diagnostic (PDD) system to perform Blue Light Cystoscopy (BLCTM) as an adjunct to the white light cystoscopy.

Important Safety Information About Cysview® (hexaminolevulinate HCl)

Cysview is not a replacement for random bladder biopsies or other procedures used in the detection of bladder cancer. 

Anaphylactoid shock, hypersensitivity reactions, bladder pain, cystitis, and abnormal urinalysis have been reported after administration of Cysview. The most common adverse reactions seen in clinical trials were bladder spasm, dysuria, hematuria, and bladder pain. 

Cysview should not be used in patients with porphyria, gross hematuria, or with known hypersensitivity to hexaminolevulinate or any derivative of aminolevulinic acid. Cysview may fail to detect some malignant lesions. False-positive fluorescence may occur due to inflammation, cystoscopic trauma, scar tissue, previous bladder biopsy and recent BCG therapy or intravesical chemotherapy. No specific drug interaction studies have been performed. 

Safety and effectiveness have not been established in pediatric patients. There are no available data on Cysview use in pregnant women. Adequate reproductive and developmental toxicity studies in animals have not been performed. Systemic absorption following administration of Cysview is expected to be minimal. There are no data on the presence of hexaminolevulinate in human or animal milk, the effects on a breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. The development and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for Cysview and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from Cysview or from the underlying maternal condition. 

Cysview is approved for use with the KARL STORZ D-Light C Photodynamic Diagnostic (PDD) system. For system set up and general information for the safe use of the PDD system, please refer to the KARL STORZ instruction manuals for each of the components. 

Prior to Cysview administration, read the Full Prescribing Information and follow the preparation and reconstitution instructions.

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Prescribing Information

Cysview is an optical imaging agent indicated for use in the cystoscopic detection of carcinoma of the bladder, including carcinoma in situ (CIS), among patients suspected or known to have lesion(s) on the basis of a prior cystoscopy, or in patients undergoing surveillance cystoscopy for carcinoma of the bladder. Cysview is used with the KARL STORZ D-Light C Photodynamic Diagnostic (PDD) system to perform Blue Light Cystoscopy (BLCTM) as an adjunct to the white light cystoscopy.

Important Safety Information About Cysview® (hexaminolevulinate HCl)

Cysview is not a replacement for random bladder biopsies or other procedures used in the detection of bladder cancer. 

Anaphylactoid shock, hypersensitivity reactions, bladder pain, cystitis, and abnormal urinalysis have been reported after administration of Cysview. The most common adverse reactions seen in clinical trials were bladder spasm, dysuria, hematuria, and bladder pain. 

Cysview should not be used in patients with porphyria, gross hematuria, or with known hypersensitivity to hexaminolevulinate or any derivative of aminolevulinic acid. Cysview may fail to detect some malignant lesions. False-positive fluorescence may occur due to inflammation, cystoscopic trauma, scar tissue, previous bladder biopsy and recent BCG therapy or intravesical chemotherapy. No specific drug interaction studies have been performed. 

Safety and effectiveness have not been established in pediatric patients. There are no available data on Cysview use in pregnant women. Adequate reproductive and developmental toxicity studies in animals have not been performed. Systemic absorption following administration of Cysview is expected to be minimal. There are no data on the presence of hexaminolevulinate in human or animal milk, the effects on a breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. The development and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for Cysview and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from Cysview or from the underlying maternal condition. 

Cysview is approved for use with the KARL STORZ D-Light C Photodynamic Diagnostic (PDD) system. For system set up and general information for the safe use of the PDD system, please refer to the KARL STORZ instruction manuals for each of the components. 

Prior to Cysview administration, read the Full Prescribing Information and follow the preparation and reconstitution instructions.

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